novel

/Tag: novel

Contextualising politics of the South African Land Fear

By |2018-10-13T20:08:17+01:00October 13th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , |

Edna Mohamed is an MA Postcolonial Studies student at SOAS, University of London. Her current research examines de-linking practises and liberation movements within the cultural form from a Black feminist lens. Her other interests are in race studies, the Muslim diaspora, postcolonial environmentalism and gender studies. Contextualising the politics of the South

Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea

By |2018-08-22T09:14:00+01:00August 15th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Wide Sargasso Sea is an important piece of literature because it encourages us to think about local and transnational literary space.

Arab Novelistic Traditions and the many multilingual realities of Arabic

By |2019-04-12T14:24:25+01:00July 27th, 2018|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

In this piece MULOSIGE researcher July Blalack reflects on her book chapter on the history of Mauritanian novels and how it fits in with the larger project of The Oxford Handbook of Arab Novelistic Traditions (OUP 2017; edited by Waïl S. Hassan). The handbook showcases how the Arabic novel has developed in many different

Football and Migrant crises: Fatou Diome’s Le Ventre de l’Atlantique

By |2019-04-12T14:26:08+01:00June 19th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Published in 2003, Fatou Diome’s début novel Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (The Belly of the Atlantic) followed a defining moment in modern Franco-Senegalese history: the 2002 Fifa World Cup.

Multilingual Counterpoint in Nuruddin Farah’s Sardines

By |2018-06-06T13:04:43+01:00May 21st, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

Tayseer Abu Odeh discusses how Somali writer Nuruddin Farah explores how to challenge narratives of history and power in his novel Sardines.

Retrospective: MULOSIGE roundtable on Aamir Mufti’s Forget English!

By |2019-04-12T14:32:06+01:00October 30th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Literary Criticism, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Fatima Burney looks back at our roundtable discussion with Professor Aamir Mufti and explores the consequences of his latest book, Forget English!, for the MULOSIGE project

Hassan Blasim’s Refugee Narratives: Travelling Between Fact and Fiction

By |2019-04-12T14:37:12+01:00August 3rd, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , |

As ‘kan ya makan’ implies, Blasim’s stories are and they are not: they impress upon readers the porous boundaries between fact and fiction, particularly at a juncture when tales of migration are gaining political and literary attention

Farewell has colors: Adam Reta’s “Colors of Adios”

By |2019-04-12T14:37:31+01:00July 14th, 2017|Categories: Horn of Africa, Literary Criticism, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In his latest Amharic novel, the Ethiopian writer Adam Reta uses the metaphor of light prisms and colours to describe how couples, histories and nations part, mix and combine

Entangled Histories: Qurratulain Hyder’s Fireflies in the Mist

By |2019-04-12T14:40:07+01:00February 21st, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, North India, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

When does a book become part of world literature? When it is translated into a major language, published by a metropolitan publisher and endorsed by renowned writers? So why has Qurratulain Hyder’s novel failed to register?

The Arch and The Butterfly by Mohammed Achaari

By |2019-04-12T14:41:07+01:00January 20th, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Arch and the Butterfly represents a fine example of the maturity of the contemporary Moroccan novel, both in its aesthetics and its politics. It is a beautifully written novel that was recognised for the mastery of its craft in 2011 when it was awarded the International Arabic Booker Prize.