Interventions

/Interventions

Making the child ‘sharīf’ in Urdu textbooks – Muslim, yet not Islamic

By |2019-04-12T14:28:48+01:00April 4th, 2018|Categories: Education and Taste, Interventions, North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Sumaira Nawaz reflects on Urdu educational texts in colonial North India and how they informed new sensibilities and identities across religious divides

Omar Berrada: Il est temps de revendiquer un cosmopolitisme du sud

By |2018-03-15T19:27:41+01:00March 15th, 2018|Categories: Interventions, Maghreb|

"La colonisation n'appartient pas au passé, elle survit à sa propre mort en organisant une double amnésie: l'effacement des cultures colonisées et l'igonrance ou le déni de cet effacement."

Sowing the seeds of subalternity in Somali Literature

By |2019-04-12T14:29:19+01:00March 5th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions, Poetry|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Photograph of Afgoye, Somalia from 2013 (source: Wiki Commons) Mohamed A. Eno is professor and dean of African Studies at St. Clements University in Mogadishu, Somalia. His groundbreaking work uses literature, especially folk poetry, to challenge the myth of a homogenous Somalia and to expose the exclusion and

Poetic inserts and the art of persuasion in the Somali novel “Aqoondarro waa u nacab jacayl” (“Ignorance is the enemy of love”) by Faarax M. J. Cawl

By |2018-01-27T14:31:28+01:00February 19th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Ruixuan Li is a first year PhD student at SOAS University of London focusing on modern Somali poetry. Her research looks at the complex identities expressed by the new generation of Somali women poets through a comparative study of their poetry in Somali and English. Ignorance is the enemy of love: the novel

The Pulaar book network: transnationalism from below?

By |2018-01-27T14:30:09+01:00February 5th, 2018|Categories: Interventions|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Researcher Melanie Bouret examines the grassroots movement for literacy in Pulaar, an African Fulani language spoken in Senegal and Mauritania (and in a vast diaspora), and shows how books circulate throughout a transregional network that is at once coordinated and spontaneous.

Iran’s official book awards: a more open ‘World’ literature

By |2019-04-12T14:30:24+01:00December 15th, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, Interventions|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iranian poet, literary critic and translator Alireza Abiz examines Iran's 'World Book Award' and the languages, works, and topics it considers and finds the prize to be surprisingly expansive in acknowledging different sources of cultural and literary exchange in Iran

Concrete Poetry: Morten Søndergaard’s Wall of Dreams

By |2019-04-12T14:30:59+01:00November 13th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Poetry|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

In the second of our series on concrete poetry, MULOSIGE's Jack Clift speaks to poet and artist Morten Søndergaard about his latest work, Wall of Dreams

Retrospective: MULOSIGE roundtable on Aamir Mufti’s Forget English!

By |2019-04-12T14:32:06+01:00October 30th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Literary Criticism, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Fatima Burney looks back at our roundtable discussion with Professor Aamir Mufti and explores the consequences of his latest book, Forget English!, for the MULOSIGE project

English is an African Language- the Language of Coexistence

By |2019-04-12T14:32:20+01:00October 27th, 2017|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions, Maghreb, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Mauritanian writer Mohmed Bouya Bamba argues that English has practical advantages for interethnic and intercountry communication in Africa, so Africans should reclaim the language instead of waging a futile ideological war

Imperial Languages/Languages and Empire: A reflection

By |2019-04-12T14:33:03+01:00October 20th, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, Interventions, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , |

MULOSIGE's Francesca Orsini interrogates a new collaborative project that explores the interaction between languages and empire and suggests that 'imperial languages' as a conceptual category should be deployed carefully