Morocco

/Tag: Morocco

“Re-imagining the Maghreb beyond Mashreqi and colonial mediation: Morocco as a case study”

By |2018-08-21T17:36:26+00:00July 31st, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Maghreb strand of MULOSIGE put together a panel for the World Congress of Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES), held in Seville (Spain), 16-20 July. Entitled “Re-imagining the Maghreb beyond Mashreqi and colonial mediation: Morocco as a case study,” the panel explored new theoretical and methodological tools to grasp Morocco’s complex cultural, literary, and historical specificities as well as its connection to wider ‘significant geographies’ including Europe, the Islamic West, and the Arabic-speaking world.

“There is No Victor But God: The Colonial Afterlife of a Medieval Granadan Motto.”

By |2018-04-25T15:29:34+00:00June 12th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , |

Grounded in nearly a decade of research in Spain and North Africa, Colonial al-Andalus explores the culture, politics, and legacies of Spanish colonialism in Morocco (1859-1956).  It traces the genealogy of a widespread idea about Morocco: namely, the idea that modern Moroccan culture descends directly from al-Andalus.

From indigenous to Catalan?: Shifting paradigms of identity in the limits of Moroccan literatures

By |2018-06-11T10:27:55+00:00June 11th, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Hispanophone Maghribi authors have not yet made inroads into the Spanish literary scene and academia, nor in the Moroccan one. This double absence derives on the one hand from the particularities of this colonial context, but it is also related to the general absence of Hispanophone literatures within the field of postcolonial studies, where issues related to the modern Spanish colonies are not often discussed.

Amazigh, Catalan, Spanish, Moroccan? Said El Kadaoui: Saying No At a Time of Flags

By |2018-04-02T13:37:06+00:00April 2nd, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , |

Laura Casielles (Spain, 1986) is a PhD student at the Department of Arabic Studies at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Her research focuses on Moroccan authors writing in French and Spanish as well as on writers of the Moroccan diaspora in Spain and France. She has a degree in Journalism, another one in Philosphy and a master

Assa, Morocco: An Unwritten History?

By |2018-06-05T10:31:22+00:00December 14th, 2017|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Through the annual festival celebrating the Mawlid, or the Prophet Muhammad's birthday, July Blalack explores the mingling multilingual poetry and oral histories from Assa, where Berber/ Amazigh tribes have long mixed with their Sahrawi neighbors.

Ibn Battuta’s legacy brought to life in Tangier festival

By |2018-06-05T10:34:49+00:00November 14th, 2017|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

Earlier this month the city of Tangier hosted a variety of academic, literary, and cultural events which brought to life the legacy of Ibn Battuta, the famous 14th-century wayfarer originally hailing from this coastal town. Tangier has a long-standing reputation as a city belonging to every nation and to no nation, as it passed

Morocco’s International Book Fair Emphasises Literary Exchange Across Africa

By |2017-08-03T13:43:56+00:00March 27th, 2017|Categories: Itineraries, Maghreb, News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Morocco hosted the 23rd Annual Casablanca International Book Fair, featuring over 350 live exhibitors and spanning a ten-day period. Any book fan would be lost for hours among the maze of stands and rows upon rows of bookshelves.

Reading group on Education and Comparative Colonialisms

By |2017-07-31T16:28:18+00:00March 15th, 2017|Categories: Past events, Reading Group|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Education systems, and the literary works they prioritized, are an excellent inroad to outlining how literary forms and cultures responded to colonialism

The Arch and The Butterfly by Mohammed Achaari

By |2017-05-23T17:33:55+00:00January 20th, 2017|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Arch and the Butterfly represents a fine example of the maturity of the contemporary Moroccan novel, both in its aesthetics and its politics. It is a beautifully written novel that was recognised for the mastery of its craft in 2011 when it was awarded the International Arabic Booker Prize.