history

/Tag: history

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference: Tambimuttu and Sivanandan: Cold-War America and International Socialism.

By |2019-03-06T12:36:38+01:00March 6th, 2019|Categories: Interventions, Podcast|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Tambimuttu and Sivanandan: Cold-War America and International Socialism Dr Ruvani Ranasinha (Kings College London) considers and contrasts the political positions and self-fashioning adopted during the careers of two mid-century Sri Lankan writers. Ranasinha recounts Tambimuttu’s self-stereotyping of the sensual Orient, first with his move to the UK in 1938, and later in terms

Asoosama gabaabaa: A short story in Oromo

By |2019-02-22T12:04:39+01:00February 22nd, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

"I did not know it" tells the story of Ruufo Gurraachaa, a girl who survived the Surro massacre as a small child. Brought up by a perpetrator of the massacre and given in marriage to an old man who orchestrated the violence, Ruufo is unaware of her tragic past. Yet these secrets cannot stay hidden. As Ruufo discovers that her husband's past brutally connects with her own, she must decide whether or not to take revenge.

Dernières nouvelles du colonialisme: legitimising collective memory in the face of legislative amnesia

By |2019-01-21T14:20:17+01:00January 21st, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Isadora Hutcheson-Lovett argues that "Dernières nouvelles du colonialisme" pushes back against French legislative power; demonstrating collective transnational memory in the face of France's metropolitan amnesia.

Is the fragmentation method used by Bao Ninh in Sorrow of War effective?

By |2018-12-13T11:42:01+01:00December 13th, 2018|Categories: Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

Christie Cheng is currently enrolled in the Masters in Cultural Studies programme at SOAS and is particularly interested in understanding contemporary Southeast Asian cultural production through film and literature. Prior to her MA course, she read English Literature at the National University of Singapore and worked as an Arts Manager for the Literary Arts

Gender and Criminality in Bangla Crime Narratives: Late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries

By |2018-07-31T11:45:15+01:00July 31st, 2018|Categories: North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Gender and Criminality in Bangla Crime Narratives: Late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries examines Bangla writings related to crime in the late 19th and early 20th century Bengal in terms of gender.

Re-imagining Histories through Farthest Field: An Indian Story of the Second World War (Raghu Karnad)

By |2019-03-20T09:53:51+01:00July 25th, 2018|Categories: North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are nations created by their histories? Raghu Karnad's book 'Farthest Field' problematizes British and Indian memorialisations of WWII.

MULOSIGE recommends: Multiple impressions: the coexistence of scribal practices and printing technologies in texts

By |2018-06-06T14:10:20+01:00June 13th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

An interdisciplinary symposium and workshop for graduate students and early-career researchers on the, Histories of the production and reproduction of texts in Asian and African geographies by copyists, scriptoria, or printers.

Orature, Literature and History: Exploring Northern Indian Popular Culture (19c-20c) – PART 1

By |2018-05-02T13:22:32+01:00May 29th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , |

How does awareness of contemporary orature change the way we approach historical texts? How can we use these texts as sources to write a history of the region which produced them? How can we use narrative patterns to compare distant forms of orature? And how can we make orature seriously part of the study of world literature?