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A Case of Exploding Markets: Latin American and South Asian Literary “Booms” in a Comparative Perspective

By |2019-06-05T09:54:36+01:00June 5th, 2019|Categories: Literary Criticism, North India, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , |

This excerpt is taken from an interview with Professor Kantor and Dr Fatima Burney about Kantor's upcoming book Even If You Gain the World: The Rise of South Asian Literature in Light of Latin America.

MULOSIGE Reading List: World Literature and Planetary Catastrophe

By |2019-05-31T10:19:51+01:00May 30th, 2019|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Genre, Literary Criticism, Members, MULOSIGE Syllabi, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Dr Florian Mussgnug (UCL) provides a reading list on World Literature and Planetary Catastrophe.

MULOSIGE Reading List: The Poetics of the Orphan In Postcolonial Literature

By |2019-05-29T10:21:00+01:00May 29th, 2019|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Maghreb, Members, MULOSIGE Syllabi, North India, Poetry, Reading|

Matt Reeck (UCLA) offers a guided reading list to interrogate the "Poetics of the Orphan in Postcolonial Literature".

MULOSIGE London Libraries Project – Arabic

By |2019-06-07T12:34:42+01:00May 15th, 2019|Categories: Maghreb, North India, Outreach, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , |

MULOSIGE is working closely with the Council of Islington and a variety of community centres in a project to make London libraries more multilingual.

MULOSIGE London Libraries Project – English

By |2019-05-22T10:18:16+01:00May 13th, 2019|Categories: Maghreb, Outreach, Past events, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , |

MULOSIGE is working closely with the Council of Islington and a variety of community centres in a project to make London libraries more multilingual.

The Ethiopian Writers’ Association: Between Multilingual Openings and Monolingual Practice

By |2019-05-03T15:02:16+01:00May 3rd, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Journals, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

When the association that claims to be “Ethiopian” restricts its policy and publications to the tradition of one language and presents that language as a representative of the country, the legitimacy of such a claim should be called into question.

Asoosama gabaabaa: A short story in Oromo

By |2019-07-08T12:57:18+01:00February 22nd, 2019|Categories: Genre, Horn of Africa, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

"I did not know it" tells the story of Ruufo Gurraachaa, a girl who survived the Surro massacre as a small child. Brought up by a perpetrator of the massacre and given in marriage to an old man who orchestrated the violence, Ruufo is unaware of her tragic past. Yet these secrets cannot stay hidden. As Ruufo discovers that her husband's past brutally connects with her own, she must decide whether or not to take revenge.

Barreessitoonni fi Qorattoonni Oromoo waa’ee Ogbarruu Oromoo Maal Jedhu?

By |2019-07-08T13:22:38+01:00February 5th, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , |

Ayele Kebede Roba discusses Oromo literature in the Oromo language; centring discussions of world literature outside of the English language.

The Oromo Reader (1894): Oromo folksongs and the sorrow of exile

By |2019-04-12T14:16:26+01:00January 31st, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms, Reading, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , , |

The second blog post on the history of Oromo folklore looks at The Oromo Reader (1894) compiled by Aster Ganno and Onesimo Nasib.

“A miniature Oromo academy in exile”: How former slaves pioneered Oromo studies

By |2019-04-12T14:16:38+01:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Dr Assefa Tefera Dibaba introduces the history of Oromo folklore studies.