literature

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Invitation to the Launch of the Arabic Language Collection at N4 Library

By |2018-11-17T14:34:14+00:00December 6th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

It is a pleasure for us to present the list of the Arabic books available at N4 Library. The acquisition of the books stems from the will, shared by Islington Council and the members of the MULOSIGE research project at SOAS (University of London), to improve services provided, especially with regard to the variety of languages, cultures and literatures that coexist in London.

Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea

By |2018-08-22T09:14:00+00:00August 15th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Wide Sargasso Sea is an important piece of literature because it encourages us to think about local and transnational literary space.

Football and Migrant crises: Fatou Diome’s Le Ventre de l’Atlantique

By |2018-06-20T09:47:15+00:00June 19th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Published in 2003, Fatou Diome’s début novel Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (The Belly of the Atlantic) followed a defining moment in modern Franco-Senegalese history: the 2002 Fifa World Cup.

From indigenous to Catalan?: Shifting paradigms of identity in the limits of Moroccan literatures

By |2018-06-11T10:27:55+00:00June 11th, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Hispanophone Maghribi authors have not yet made inroads into the Spanish literary scene and academia, nor in the Moroccan one. This double absence derives on the one hand from the particularities of this colonial context, but it is also related to the general absence of Hispanophone literatures within the field of postcolonial studies, where issues related to the modern Spanish colonies are not often discussed.

Orature, Literature and History: Exploring Northern Indian Popular Culture (19c-20c) – PART 1

By |2018-05-02T13:22:32+00:00May 29th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , |

How does awareness of contemporary orature change the way we approach historical texts? How can we use these texts as sources to write a history of the region which produced them? How can we use narrative patterns to compare distant forms of orature? And how can we make orature seriously part of the study of world literature?

What’s in a Meme?: Literature, Representation, and Renegotiation.

By |2018-06-06T13:09:38+00:00May 21st, 2018|Categories: Interventions, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Jenny Carla Moran is a Postcolonial studies MA student at SOAS University of London. She is the co-founder and a previous co-head editor of Trinity College Dublin's feminist journal, nemesis. Her current research interests include post-structuralism, gender theory, and embodiment in the digital age. Her perpetual interests include circles of femme friendships and cats."

William Wellington Gqoba’s Isizwe Esinembali Xhosa Histories And Poetry (1873 – 1888)

By |2018-06-06T13:10:06+00:00May 3rd, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Sanele Ntshingana recently received an honours degree in African languages from Rhodes University. He is now studying for an MA in African Languages with a focus on historical sociolinguistics. His research interests include Xhosa historiography, the making and unmaking of archive and the production of "history". The late eighteenth century southern seaboard