Maghreb

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Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference Report

By |2019-02-21T10:57:15+01:00February 21st, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions, Maghreb, North India, Past events, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference was convened at SOAS University of London on the 11-12th January 2019. The methodological conditions behind the conference are to consider the historical moment of the Cold War in ways other than by splitting the world into two spheres.

Arab Novelistic Traditions and the many multilingual realities of Arabic

By |2018-07-27T09:09:14+01:00July 27th, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

In this piece MULOSIGE researcher July Blalack reflects on her book chapter on the history of Mauritanian novels and how it fits in with the larger project of The Oxford Handbook of Arab Novelistic Traditions (OUP 2017; edited by Waïl S. Hassan). The handbook showcases how the Arabic novel has developed in many different

Writing Rumi in Whitman’s Image: On Coleman Barks, and the Appropriation of Rumi’s Poetry

By |2018-07-18T17:34:36+01:00July 18th, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Barks looks to create a rendition of Rumi that is intelligible to him. This endeavor manifests as a form of Orientalism, however subtle: it is Barks’ project to create Rumi and Rumi's poetry in his own image.

From indigenous to Catalan?: Shifting paradigms of identity in the limits of Moroccan literatures

By |2018-06-11T10:27:55+01:00June 11th, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Hispanophone Maghribi authors have not yet made inroads into the Spanish literary scene and academia, nor in the Moroccan one. This double absence derives on the one hand from the particularities of this colonial context, but it is also related to the general absence of Hispanophone literatures within the field of postcolonial studies, where issues related to the modern Spanish colonies are not often discussed.

Amazigh, Catalan, Spanish, Moroccan? Said El Kadaoui: Saying No At a Time of Flags

By |2018-04-02T13:37:06+01:00April 2nd, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , |

Laura Casielles (Spain, 1986) is a PhD student at the Department of Arabic Studies at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Her research focuses on Moroccan authors writing in French and Spanish as well as on writers of the Moroccan diaspora in Spain and France. She has a degree in Journalism, another one in Philosphy and a master

Omar Berrada: Il est temps de revendiquer un cosmopolitisme du sud

By |2018-03-15T19:27:41+01:00March 15th, 2018|Categories: Interventions, Maghreb|

"La colonisation n'appartient pas au passé, elle survit à sa propre mort en organisant une double amnésie: l'effacement des cultures colonisées et l'igonrance ou le déni de cet effacement."

Kamel Kilani’s magical stories revolutionized Arabic children’s literature

By |2018-06-06T13:14:04+01:00January 1st, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Kamel Kilani, a pioneer of children's literature in Arabic, translated and redacted from a remarkably catholic range of sources, as Egyptian writer Baheyya explores in this reposted blog

Assa, Morocco: An Unwritten History?

By |2018-06-05T10:31:22+01:00December 14th, 2017|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Through the annual festival celebrating the Mawlid, or the Prophet Muhammad's birthday, July Blalack explores the mingling multilingual poetry and oral histories from Assa, where Berber/ Amazigh tribes have long mixed with their Sahrawi neighbors.

‘1920 to 1930’: Prohibition and the Arabic Short Story in New York City

By |2018-06-06T13:15:00+01:00December 7th, 2017|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

This Arabic short story published in New York during the Prohibition Era uses science fiction to imagine just how far banning certain beverages could possibly go. Raphael Cormack translated the story into English, and includes an introduction which contextualizes the story and 'Al-Akhlaq' journal as part of a larger Arabic literature and news scene set in New York in the early 20th century

Ibn Battuta’s legacy brought to life in Tangier festival

By |2018-06-05T10:34:49+01:00November 14th, 2017|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

Earlier this month the city of Tangier hosted a variety of academic, literary, and cultural events which brought to life the legacy of Ibn Battuta, the famous 14th-century wayfarer originally hailing from this coastal town. Tangier has a long-standing reputation as a city belonging to every nation and to no nation, as it passed