historiography

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Re-imagining Histories through Farthest Field: An Indian Story of the Second World War (Raghu Karnad)

By |2018-07-25T12:09:44+00:00July 25th, 2018|Categories: North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are nations created by their histories? Raghu Karnad's book 'Farthest Field' problematizes British and Indian memorialisations of WWII.

Retrospective: MULOSIGE roundtable on Aamir Mufti’s Forget English!

By |2018-06-06T13:15:52+00:00October 30th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Fatima Burney looks back at our roundtable discussion with Professor Aamir Mufti and explores the consequences of his latest book, Forget English!, for the MULOSIGE project

Approaches to Global Intellectual History: Jürgen Osterhammel

By |2017-08-19T19:36:44+00:00July 4th, 2017|Categories: Interventions|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Jürgen Osterhammel discusses Eurocentrism and the status of world history in the German academy

The Code of History and non-Western Pasts: does historiography travel?

By |2017-08-05T16:23:12+00:00October 12th, 2016|Categories: Podcast|Tags: , , , , |

Professor Sanjay Seth (Goldsmiths) argues that history-writing is not the recreation of a past that is always-already there, lying mute and waiting for the historian to give it voice, but is instead a code or genre or technology, one which constructs the past in ways that make it amenable to representation through the code of history.

The Code of History and non-Western Pasts: does historiography travel?

By |2017-03-28T13:03:11+00:00October 12th, 2016|Tags: , , |

History-writing is not the recreation of a past that is always-already there, lying mute and waiting for the historian to give it voice, but is instead one which constructs the past in ways that make it amenable to representation through the code of history by Professor Sanjay Seth (Goldsmiths).

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