India

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“Reading together” in multilingual contexts beyond monolingual methodologies

By |2019-04-12T14:10:45+01:00March 20th, 2019|Categories: Events, Literary Criticism, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The conference programme for "Reading Together" in Multilingual Contexts Beyond Monolingual Methodologies, to be held in Università degli Studi di Napoli L’Orientale, Naples 11-12 April 2019.

Mysteries of the Indian Jungle – Emilio Salgari’s Orientalist adventures

By |2019-04-12T14:21:55+01:00September 12th, 2018|Categories: Education and Taste, North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

No Italian writer has left a deeper and more lasting imprint over Italian readers of a certain exotic image of India than Emilio Salgari (1862-1922). His adventure books spanning four continents rank among the classics of adventure/children’s literature. Indeed, were popularity alone determined membership to world literature, Salgari would count as the foremost Italian writer in the world.

Re-imagining Histories through Farthest Field: An Indian Story of the Second World War (Raghu Karnad)

By |2019-04-12T14:24:59+01:00July 25th, 2018|Categories: Education and Taste, Literary Criticism, North India, Reading, Themes|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are nations created by their histories? Raghu Karnad's book 'Farthest Field' problematizes British and Indian memorialisations of WWII.

Making the child ‘sharīf’ in Urdu textbooks – Muslim, yet not Islamic

By |2019-04-12T14:28:48+01:00April 4th, 2018|Categories: Education and Taste, Interventions, North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Sumaira Nawaz reflects on Urdu educational texts in colonial North India and how they informed new sensibilities and identities across religious divides

Women poets of Ancient Greece, India, and Eritrea: a comparison across time and space

By |2019-04-12T14:29:33+01:00January 21st, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Horn of Africa, Literary Criticism, North India|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Tedros Abraham takes us on a journey across time and continents, comparing the way three women poets in Ancient Greece, India and Eritrea claim immortality through their poems and rebel against social norms

Discovering eco-criticism in Hindi: Renu’s Tale of a barren land

By |2018-06-06T13:13:28+01:00December 26th, 2017|Categories: North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

In an ecocritical reading of Hindi author Phaniswarnath Renu, Amul Gyawali explores the dichotomies in his writing: state-society, centre-periphery and, crucially, man-nature

SOAS CCLPS Critical Forum – Nadeschda Bachem & Yan Jia

By |2019-04-12T14:37:59+01:00July 6th, 2017|Categories: Genre, Interventions, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Opening horizons to the multifacetedness of cultural production on the Asian continent using case studies from Japan and South Korea, China and India

Reading group on Education and Comparative Colonialisms

By |2019-04-12T14:39:34+01:00March 15th, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, Past events, Reading Group|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Education systems, and the literary works they prioritized, are an excellent inroad to outlining how literary forms and cultures responded to colonialism

Reading group with Javed Majeed (King’s College London)

By |2019-04-12T14:39:53+01:00February 22nd, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, North India, Past events, Reading Group, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Javed Majeed joined us for an informative and enjoyable reading group where we discussed his work on the Linguistic Survey of India and its superintendent, George Grierson.

Entangled Histories: Qurratulain Hyder’s Fireflies in the Mist

By |2019-04-12T14:40:07+01:00February 21st, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, North India, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

When does a book become part of world literature? When it is translated into a major language, published by a metropolitan publisher and endorsed by renowned writers? So why has Qurratulain Hyder’s novel failed to register?