Popular and Pulp Fiction

/Popular and Pulp Fiction

Our research shows that, partly for material reasons, magazines and short genres have been much more significant for the visibility and circulation of world literature, at least in the regions of our project.

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference: Hindi literary activism in the 1950s

By |2019-04-12T14:15:40+01:00February 14th, 2019|Categories: Journals, Literary Criticism, North India, Podcast, Popular and Pulp Fiction|Tags: |

Professor Francesca Orsini (SOAS), examines the production and re-production of short stories in Hindi literary magazines in the 1950s, offering a case study of the Hindi magazine Kahani (Short Story, 1954). She argues that world literature can only be envisioned and produced through local views, rather than under one overarching banner of what constitutes “world literature.” Her talk highlights the medium of the magazine as a site of non-state literary activism that placed readers and young writers at the center, the preference for the story as opposed to the novel, and the multilingual knowledge that animated reading practices, even when publication occurred in a single language (Hindi).

Football and Migrant crises: Fatou Diome’s Le Ventre de l’Atlantique

By |2019-04-12T14:26:08+01:00June 19th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Published in 2003, Fatou Diome’s début novel Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (The Belly of the Atlantic) followed a defining moment in modern Franco-Senegalese history: the 2002 Fifa World Cup.

Khabees Orat: A reflection on bi-cultural humour

By |2019-04-12T14:26:30+01:00June 14th, 2018|Categories: Genre, North India, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The character “Khabees Orat. portrays the opposite of what an average Pakistani woman is expected to be, in return becoming the representation of the inner voice of a large majority of local women. ” Where “orat” can literally be translated into “woman”, “Khabees” is a combination of “notorious,” “wicked, “dishonorable,” “devilish” and “corrupt” qualities.

SOAS CCLPS Critical Forum – Nadeschda Bachem & Yan Jia

By |2019-04-12T14:37:59+01:00July 6th, 2017|Categories: Genre, Interventions, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Opening horizons to the multifacetedness of cultural production on the Asian continent using case studies from Japan and South Korea, China and India