Shakespeare

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Vahni Capildeo: The Mother Tongue is an Evil Myth

By |2019-04-12T14:20:25+01:00October 21st, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Poetry, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Is there such thing as a single language? Capildeo's poetry emphasises linguistic multiplicity even in monoglot societies.

To English, or not to English? Shakespeare as a translator

By |2019-04-12T14:34:00+01:00October 3rd, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Literary Criticism, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Guest contributor Jennifer E. Nicholson questions the idea of Shakespeare as a quintessentially English author, and describes instead ‘un-Englished’ Shakespeare who was not limited to either a single locality or language

Hamlet at Helsingør: performance across time, space and language

By |2019-04-12T14:35:59+01:00August 5th, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Watching 'Hamlet Live' at Kronborg Castle creates a sense of both familiarity and distance that helps us think about how literatures travel and come to be shared

Shakespeare in Yemen

By |2019-04-12T14:41:58+01:00October 19th, 2016|Categories: Podcast, Translations|Tags: , , , , |

Dr Katherine Hennessey (Warwick) discusses Yemen as perhaps the only country in the world that can lay claim to a history of theatre that begins with a performance of Shakespeare and explores the surprisingly vibrant history of adaptations of Shakespeare on the Yemeni stage. Listen to the podcast.

Shakespeare in Yemen

By |2017-03-29T17:50:18+01:00October 19th, 2016|Categories: |Tags: , , , , |

Yemen is perhaps the only country in the world that can lay claim to a history of theatre that begins with a performance of Shakespeare. The first documented play by Yemeni actors was Julius Caesar, in Arabic translation, performed in a public square in Aden in 1910. This lecture explores the surprisingly vibrant history of adaptations of Shakespeare on the Yemeni stage.

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