Genre

/Genre

Through a more critical engagement with the role of genre in debates on World Literature, we seek to make visible the different perspectives that become available when we give focused attention towards lesser acknowledged mediums and genres.

MULOSIGE Reading List: World Literature and Planetary Catastrophe

By |2019-05-31T10:19:51+01:00May 30th, 2019|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Genre, Literary Criticism, Members, MULOSIGE Syllabi, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Dr Florian Mussgnug (UCL) provides a reading list on World Literature and Planetary Catastrophe.

MULOSIGE Syllabus: Science, Literature and Development in the MENA Region

By |2019-05-28T11:25:53+01:00May 28th, 2019|Categories: Genre, Horn of Africa, Maghreb, Members, MULOSIGE Syllabi, Popular and Pulp Fiction|Tags: , , , , , , , |

This is a course about the relationship between science, literature and development in the MENA region and the role science fiction in world literature.

Asoosama gabaabaa: A short story in Oromo

By |2019-07-08T12:57:18+01:00February 22nd, 2019|Categories: Genre, Horn of Africa, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

"I did not know it" tells the story of Ruufo Gurraachaa, a girl who survived the Surro massacre as a small child. Brought up by a perpetrator of the massacre and given in marriage to an old man who orchestrated the violence, Ruufo is unaware of her tragic past. Yet these secrets cannot stay hidden. As Ruufo discovers that her husband's past brutally connects with her own, she must decide whether or not to take revenge.

Sultana’s Dream: An alternative view of colonial Bengal.

By |2019-04-12T14:21:29+01:00September 25th, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Genre, North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Sinjini Chatterjee discusses the portrayal of a female utopia in Rokeya Hossain's Engish language short story, "Sultana's Dream".

Gender and Criminality in Bangla Crime Narratives: Late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries

By |2019-04-12T14:24:10+01:00July 31st, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Genre, North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Gender and Criminality in Bangla Crime Narratives: Late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries examines Bangla writings related to crime in the late 19th and early 20th century Bengal in terms of gender.

Khabees Orat: A reflection on bi-cultural humour

By |2019-04-12T14:26:30+01:00June 14th, 2018|Categories: Genre, North India, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The character “Khabees Orat. portrays the opposite of what an average Pakistani woman is expected to be, in return becoming the representation of the inner voice of a large majority of local women. ” Where “orat” can literally be translated into “woman”, “Khabees” is a combination of “notorious,” “wicked, “dishonorable,” “devilish” and “corrupt” qualities.

Kamel Kilani’s magical stories revolutionized Arabic children’s literature

By |2019-04-12T14:29:46+01:00January 1st, 2018|Categories: Genre, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Kamel Kilani, a pioneer of children's literature in Arabic, translated and redacted from a remarkably catholic range of sources, as Egyptian writer Baheyya explores in this reposted blog

‘1920 to 1930’: Prohibition and the Arabic Short Story in New York City

By |2019-04-12T14:30:50+01:00December 7th, 2017|Categories: Genre, Journals, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

This Arabic short story published in New York during the Prohibition Era uses science fiction to imagine just how far banning certain beverages could possibly go. Raphael Cormack translated the story into English, and includes an introduction which contextualizes the story and 'Al-Akhlaq' journal as part of a larger Arabic literature and news scene set in New York in the early 20th century

Concrete Poetry: The Art of Words and Meaning

By |2019-04-12T14:33:44+01:00October 11th, 2017|Categories: Genre, Interventions, Poetry|Tags: , , , |

In the first installment of a MULOSIGE series on concrete poetry, July Blalack explores how the aesthetics of texts can break down linguistic boundaries