Gender and Queer Studies

/Gender and Queer Studies

The multilingual literatures from the Horn of Africa, North Africa and North India also challenge the narrative of ‘homosexual identity’ under capitalism represented by the rubric of ‘global queering.’

“Ach Ba Gá Dom Labhairt Leat:” An Foclóir Aiteach and the Presence of Queer Culture as Gaeilge.

By |2019-04-12T14:17:26+01:00January 14th, 2019|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Jenny Moran introduces An Foclóir Aiteach, a dictionary that writes queer terminology into the Irish language.

Sultana’s Dream: An alternative view of colonial Bengal.

By |2019-04-12T14:21:29+01:00September 25th, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Genre, North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Sinjini Chatterjee discusses the portrayal of a female utopia in Rokeya Hossain's Engish language short story, "Sultana's Dream".

NourbeSe Philip and destroying the English language

By |2019-04-12T14:23:26+01:00August 2nd, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

Can the act of recycling the English language liberate those who have been snubbed by the hegemonic power? Is it a way of turning the master’s tools [...] against itself to be used as a device that dismantles the master’s unhinged, socially stratified house? 

Gender and Criminality in Bangla Crime Narratives: Late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries

By |2019-04-12T14:24:10+01:00July 31st, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Genre, North India, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Gender and Criminality in Bangla Crime Narratives: Late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries examines Bangla writings related to crime in the late 19th and early 20th century Bengal in terms of gender.

MULOSIGE Syllabus: Multilingual perspectives on gender in world literature

By |2019-04-12T14:25:44+01:00July 18th, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Members, MULOSIGE Syllabi|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

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Women poets of Ancient Greece, India, and Eritrea: a comparison across time and space

By |2019-04-12T14:29:33+01:00January 21st, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Horn of Africa, Literary Criticism, North India|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Tedros Abraham takes us on a journey across time and continents, comparing the way three women poets in Ancient Greece, India and Eritrea claim immortality through their poems and rebel against social norms

Only a quarter of translated fiction originally written by women

By |2019-04-12T14:36:08+01:00August 3rd, 2017|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Interventions, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Only a tiny fraction of fiction published in English is translated, and only about a quarter of that translated fiction was originally written by women. And yet there are so many amazing women-authored books out there in the world – books we’re missing out on

Al-hubb Al-mustaheel / L’amour impossible: Love in a Time of Artificial Wombs

By |2019-04-12T14:40:47+01:00January 29th, 2017|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Gender and Queer Studies, Genre, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Most Mauritanian fiction seems almost obsessively ethnographic but Moussa Ould Ibno breaks away from this trend and uses Science Fiction to comment on ethical questions of reproductive technology and love.