Journals

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Our research shows that, partly for material reasons, magazines and short genres have been much more significant for the visibility and circulation of world literature, at least in the regions of our project.

MULOSIGE’s Special Issue Part II: Worlding Genres and Refractions

By |2019-06-14T11:24:40+01:00June 14th, 2019|Categories: Journals, Literary Criticism|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Professor Francesca Orsini and Laetitia Zecchini compiled Part II of the Special Issue: The Locations of (World) Literature: Perspectives from Africa and South Asia - Worlding Genres and Refractions. Orsini, Francesca and Letitia Zecchini (eds.) Special Issue: The Locations of (World) Literature: Perspectives from Africa and South Asia - Part II: Worlding Genres

MULOSIGE’s Special Issue: Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

By |2019-05-30T10:59:50+01:00May 30th, 2019|Categories: Journals, Literary Criticism|

Explore MULOSIGE's Special Issue of Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

The Ethiopian Writers’ Association: Between Multilingual Openings and Monolingual Practice

By |2019-05-03T15:02:16+01:00May 3rd, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Journals, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

When the association that claims to be “Ethiopian” restricts its policy and publications to the tradition of one language and presents that language as a representative of the country, the legitimacy of such a claim should be called into question.

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference: Tambimuttu and Sivanandan: Cold-War America and International Socialism.

By |2019-04-12T14:12:40+01:00March 6th, 2019|Categories: Journals, Podcast|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Tambimuttu and Sivanandan: Cold-War America and International Socialism Dr Ruvani Ranasinha (Kings College London) considers and contrasts the political positions and self-fashioning adopted during the careers of two mid-century Sri Lankan writers. Ranasinha recounts Tambimuttu’s self-stereotyping of the sensual Orient, first with his move to the UK in 1938, and later in terms

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference Report

By |2019-04-12T14:14:35+01:00February 21st, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Journals, Literary Criticism, Maghreb, North India, Past events|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference was convened at SOAS University of London on the 11-12th January 2019. The methodological conditions behind the conference are to consider the historical moment of the Cold War in ways other than by splitting the world into two spheres.

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference: Hindi literary activism in the 1950s

By |2019-04-12T14:15:40+01:00February 14th, 2019|Categories: Journals, Literary Criticism, North India, Podcast, Popular and Pulp Fiction|Tags: |

Professor Francesca Orsini (SOAS), examines the production and re-production of short stories in Hindi literary magazines in the 1950s, offering a case study of the Hindi magazine Kahani (Short Story, 1954). She argues that world literature can only be envisioned and produced through local views, rather than under one overarching banner of what constitutes “world literature.” Her talk highlights the medium of the magazine as a site of non-state literary activism that placed readers and young writers at the center, the preference for the story as opposed to the novel, and the multilingual knowledge that animated reading practices, even when publication occurred in a single language (Hindi).

‘1920 to 1930’: Prohibition and the Arabic Short Story in New York City

By |2019-04-12T14:30:50+01:00December 7th, 2017|Categories: Genre, Journals, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

This Arabic short story published in New York during the Prohibition Era uses science fiction to imagine just how far banning certain beverages could possibly go. Raphael Cormack translated the story into English, and includes an introduction which contextualizes the story and 'Al-Akhlaq' journal as part of a larger Arabic literature and news scene set in New York in the early 20th century