Orality and Oral Forms

/Orality and Oral Forms

As part of our effort to make visible the literary genres, themes, and mediums that are hitherto underacknowledged in studies of World Literature, one of the areas we focus on is orature.

Oral Traditions in World Literature – Conference Programme

By |2019-10-31T12:58:49+01:00October 31st, 2019|Categories: Events, Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms|

The MULOSIGE project (Multilingual Locals, Significant Geographies: SOAS University of London) is organising the conference Oral Traditions in World Literature on the 17-18 December 2019. This conference will take place at the Addis Regency Hotel, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia). Oral Traditions in World Literature 17-18 December 2019, Addis Regency Hotel, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)

MULOSIGE Reading List: Orature, World Literature and Mobility

By |2019-08-05T16:08:17+01:00August 5th, 2019|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Members, MULOSIGE Syllabi, North India, Orality and Oral Forms, Popular and Pulp Fiction|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Professor Catherine Servan-Schreiber (CNRS Paris) offers a reading list that explores orature and mobility in North Indian popular culture.

Oral Traditions in World Literature – Addis Ababa Conference

By |2019-11-04T12:53:25+01:00July 2nd, 2019|Categories: Events, Horn of Africa, Itineraries, Literary Criticism, Orality and Oral Forms|Tags: , , , , , |

In this conference, we argue that oral traditions are a vital component of world literature, and not only as an antecedent to written literatures, but in their own right. The conference seeks to move past the characterisation of oral literature as traditional, locally constrained, and less aesthetically complex than written literatures. We will show instead that oral traditions are a modern and dynamic form of literary expression everywhere around the world, sometimes able to circulate across long distances.

Being Human

By |2019-05-14T16:08:16+01:00May 13th, 2019|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Maghreb, North India, Orality and Oral Forms, Past events, Podcast, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |

In this podcast, Dr Vayu Naidu discusses the MULOSIGE project with Professor Francesca Orsini, Itzea Goikolea-Amiano and Jack Clift. As part of the Being Human festival, Dr Vayu Naidu gives a storytelling workshop at the N4 Library and discusses how multiple languages, improvisation and music can create fascinating new paths for stories and literature to travel across the world.

The Oromo Reader (1894): Oromo folksongs and the sorrow of exile

By |2019-04-12T14:16:26+01:00January 31st, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms, Reading, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , , |

The second blog post on the history of Oromo folklore looks at The Oromo Reader (1894) compiled by Aster Ganno and Onesimo Nasib.

“A miniature Oromo academy in exile”: How former slaves pioneered Oromo studies

By |2019-04-12T14:16:38+01:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Dr Assefa Tefera Dibaba introduces the history of Oromo folklore studies.

Multilingual Poetry: Kwame Write in Paris, Accra, Copenhagen

By |2019-04-12T14:35:33+01:00August 11th, 2017|Categories: Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms, Past events, Poetry, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Poetry doesn't need to be completely understood to be experienced, making it an ideal medium for multilingual expression. Here multimodal artist Kwame Write talks to MULOSIGE about the language of water and about multilingualism in his life and work.