Maghreb

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Ibn Battuta’s legacy brought to life in Tangier festival

By |2018-06-05T10:34:49+01:00November 14th, 2017|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

Earlier this month the city of Tangier hosted a variety of academic, literary, and cultural events which brought to life the legacy of Ibn Battuta, the famous 14th-century wayfarer originally hailing from this coastal town. Tangier has a long-standing reputation as a city belonging to every nation and to no nation, as it passed

Celebrating Online African Literature with The Brittle Paper Literary Awards

By |2019-04-12T14:31:48+01:00November 4th, 2017|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Horn of Africa, Maghreb|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

'Brittle Paper' founder Dr. Ainehi Edoro talks to Sana Goyal about how recognizing and promoting African literature online can fill in gaps left by traditional literary outlets and their gatekeepers.

English is an African Language- the Language of Coexistence

By |2019-04-12T14:32:20+01:00October 27th, 2017|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions, Maghreb, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Mauritanian writer Mohmed Bouya Bamba argues that English has practical advantages for interethnic and intercountry communication in Africa, so Africans should reclaim the language instead of waging a futile ideological war

Fictional translation in ‘Sāq al-bāmbū’ is erased in ‘The Bamboo Stalk’

By |2019-04-12T14:34:17+01:00September 29th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Maghreb, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , |

Kuwaiti novel 'Saq al-Bambu' is presented as a text translated from Tagalog even though it was originally written in Arabic- however, the English translation completely erases the fictional translation aspect.

Hassan Blasim’s Refugee Narratives: Travelling Between Fact and Fiction

By |2019-04-12T14:37:12+01:00August 3rd, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , |

As ‘kan ya makan’ implies, Blasim’s stories are and they are not: they impress upon readers the porous boundaries between fact and fiction, particularly at a juncture when tales of migration are gaining political and literary attention

Morocco’s International Book Fair Emphasises Literary Exchange Across Africa

By |2019-04-12T14:39:05+01:00March 27th, 2017|Categories: Itineraries, Maghreb, News, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Morocco hosted the 23rd Annual Casablanca International Book Fair, featuring over 350 live exhibitors and spanning a ten-day period. Any book fan would be lost for hours among the maze of stands and rows upon rows of bookshelves.

Why do we read so few translations?

By |2019-04-12T14:40:13+01:00January 29th, 2017|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions, Maghreb, News, North India, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , |

Statistics show that only between 3 - 5% of literary books published in the UK are translations. Ann Morgan in A Year of Reading the World writes about the difficulty in finding out about and getting hold of translations, even in the age of global publishing.

Al-hubb Al-mustaheel / L’amour impossible: Love in a Time of Artificial Wombs

By |2019-04-12T14:40:47+01:00January 29th, 2017|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Gender and Queer Studies, Genre, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Most Mauritanian fiction seems almost obsessively ethnographic but Moussa Ould Ibno breaks away from this trend and uses Science Fiction to comment on ethical questions of reproductive technology and love.

The Arch and The Butterfly by Mohammed Achaari

By |2019-04-12T14:41:07+01:00January 20th, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Arch and the Butterfly represents a fine example of the maturity of the contemporary Moroccan novel, both in its aesthetics and its politics. It is a beautifully written novel that was recognised for the mastery of its craft in 2011 when it was awarded the International Arabic Booker Prize.