Horn of Africa

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The Oromo Reader (1894): Oromo folksongs and the sorrow of exile

By |2019-04-12T14:16:26+01:00January 31st, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms, Reading, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , , |

The second blog post on the history of Oromo folklore looks at The Oromo Reader (1894) compiled by Aster Ganno and Onesimo Nasib.

“A miniature Oromo academy in exile”: How former slaves pioneered Oromo studies

By |2019-04-12T14:16:38+01:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Orality and Oral Forms, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Dr Assefa Tefera Dibaba introduces the history of Oromo folklore studies.

Dernières nouvelles du colonialisme: legitimising collective memory in the face of legislative amnesia

By |2019-04-12T14:17:09+01:00January 21st, 2019|Categories: Education and Taste, Horn of Africa, Reading, Themes, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Isadora Hutcheson-Lovett argues that "Dernières nouvelles du colonialisme" pushes back against French legislative power; demonstrating collective transnational memory in the face of France's metropolitan amnesia.

Ethiopia and the convergence of antifascist and anticolonial activism in the 1930s

By |2019-04-12T14:19:40+01:00November 21st, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Literary Criticism, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

Dr Sara Marzagora reviews Neelam Srivastava's new book "Italian Colonialism and Resistances to Empire, 1930-1977"

Vahni Capildeo: The Mother Tongue is an Evil Myth

By |2019-04-12T14:20:25+01:00October 21st, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Poetry, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Is there such thing as a single language? Capildeo's poetry emphasises linguistic multiplicity even in monoglot societies.

Contextualising politics of the South African Land Fear

By |2018-10-13T20:08:17+01:00October 13th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , |

Edna Mohamed is an MA Postcolonial Studies student at SOAS, University of London. Her current research examines de-linking practises and liberation movements within the cultural form from a Black feminist lens. Her other interests are in race studies, the Muslim diaspora, postcolonial environmentalism and gender studies. Contextualising the politics of the South

Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea

By |2018-08-22T09:14:00+01:00August 15th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Wide Sargasso Sea is an important piece of literature because it encourages us to think about local and transnational literary space.

NourbeSe Philip and destroying the English language

By |2019-04-12T14:23:26+01:00August 2nd, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , |

Can the act of recycling the English language liberate those who have been snubbed by the hegemonic power? Is it a way of turning the master’s tools [...] against itself to be used as a device that dismantles the master’s unhinged, socially stratified house? 

Somali

By |2018-07-31T10:09:44+01:00July 31st, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa|Tags: , , |

Aisha Afrah is a broadcast journalist at BBC World Service, she is a poet and a short fiction writer. Aisha has an M.A. in African Literature from  SOAS University. Her interests include translation and multilingualism within the Somali territories. Her poetry explores themes such as home, womanhood, being a refugee and self-love. Dadka deegannada

Football and Migrant crises: Fatou Diome’s Le Ventre de l’Atlantique

By |2019-04-12T14:26:08+01:00June 19th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Published in 2003, Fatou Diome’s début novel Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (The Belly of the Atlantic) followed a defining moment in modern Franco-Senegalese history: the 2002 Fifa World Cup.