Arabic

/Tag: Arabic

Arab Novelistic Traditions and the many multilingual realities of Arabic

By |2019-04-12T14:24:25+01:00July 27th, 2018|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

In this piece MULOSIGE researcher July Blalack reflects on her book chapter on the history of Mauritanian novels and how it fits in with the larger project of The Oxford Handbook of Arab Novelistic Traditions (OUP 2017; edited by Waïl S. Hassan). The handbook showcases how the Arabic novel has developed in many different

Un-othering ‘trauma’ through Arabic fiction: A case study in re-defining the terms of critical thought

By |2018-05-02T13:16:01+01:00May 9th, 2018|Categories: |Tags: , , , , , , , |

Looking at two distinctly different types of trauma narratives written in Arabic, Under the Midmorning Sun by Ibrahim Nasrallah (2002) and B as in Beirut (1997, trans 2008) by Iman Humaydan, the paper gives short readings that disrupt two pillars of trauma theory.

‘1920 to 1930’: Prohibition and the Arabic Short Story in New York City

By |2019-04-12T14:30:50+01:00December 7th, 2017|Categories: Genre, Journals, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

This Arabic short story published in New York during the Prohibition Era uses science fiction to imagine just how far banning certain beverages could possibly go. Raphael Cormack translated the story into English, and includes an introduction which contextualizes the story and 'Al-Akhlaq' journal as part of a larger Arabic literature and news scene set in New York in the early 20th century

Fictional translation in ‘Sāq al-bāmbū’ is erased in ‘The Bamboo Stalk’

By |2019-04-12T14:34:17+01:00September 29th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Maghreb, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , |

Kuwaiti novel 'Saq al-Bambu' is presented as a text translated from Tagalog even though it was originally written in Arabic- however, the English translation completely erases the fictional translation aspect.

Hassan Blasim’s Refugee Narratives: Travelling Between Fact and Fiction

By |2019-04-12T14:37:12+01:00August 3rd, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , |

As ‘kan ya makan’ implies, Blasim’s stories are and they are not: they impress upon readers the porous boundaries between fact and fiction, particularly at a juncture when tales of migration are gaining political and literary attention

Morocco’s International Book Fair Emphasises Literary Exchange Across Africa

By |2019-04-12T14:39:05+01:00March 27th, 2017|Categories: Itineraries, Maghreb, News, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Morocco hosted the 23rd Annual Casablanca International Book Fair, featuring over 350 live exhibitors and spanning a ten-day period. Any book fan would be lost for hours among the maze of stands and rows upon rows of bookshelves.

Girlhood translated: Fénelon’s De l’éducation des filles (1687) as a text of Egyptian modernity (1901, 1909)

By |2017-03-28T13:20:51+01:00March 21st, 2017|Categories: |Tags: , , , , , , |

In an era of intense cultural translation in Egypt, and as a market and constituency for gendered conduct-oriented school texts was emerging, what was the valence of Fénelon’s work? How did it operate as an Egyptian and Arabic text? With Professor Marilyn Booth (Oxford)

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Reading group on Education and Comparative Colonialisms

By |2019-04-12T14:39:34+01:00March 15th, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, Past events, Reading Group|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Education systems, and the literary works they prioritized, are an excellent inroad to outlining how literary forms and cultures responded to colonialism

Landscapes of a Lyric Empire

By |2017-03-28T12:46:08+01:00March 8th, 2017|Categories: , |Tags: , , , , , |

Presenting the comparative poetics of Sir William Jones to demonstrate the role of orientalist readings of ghazals in the history of lyricization. Jones was one of the first litterateurs to treat ‘lyrick’ as a universal category and to translate Persian ghazals as ‘lyricks’. Dr Fatima Burney (SOAS)

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