world literature

/Tag: world literature

“Re-imagining the Maghreb beyond Mashreqi and colonial mediation: Morocco as a case study”

By |2018-08-21T17:36:26+01:00July 31st, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Maghreb strand of MULOSIGE put together a panel for the World Congress of Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES), held in Seville (Spain), 16-20 July. Entitled “Re-imagining the Maghreb beyond Mashreqi and colonial mediation: Morocco as a case study,” the panel explored new theoretical and methodological tools to grasp Morocco’s complex cultural, literary, and historical specificities as well as its connection to wider ‘significant geographies’ including Europe, the Islamic West, and the Arabic-speaking world.

Arab Novelistic Traditions and the many multilingual realities of Arabic

By |2018-07-27T09:09:14+01:00July 27th, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

In this piece MULOSIGE researcher July Blalack reflects on her book chapter on the history of Mauritanian novels and how it fits in with the larger project of The Oxford Handbook of Arab Novelistic Traditions (OUP 2017; edited by Waïl S. Hassan). The handbook showcases how the Arabic novel has developed in many different

MULOSIGE Syllabus: Multilingual perspectives on gender in world literature

By |2018-07-18T14:42:26+01:00July 18th, 2018|Categories: Members, MULOSIGE Syllabi|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

To access this content, please register as a member of the MULOSIGE online community by visiting: http://mulosige.soas.ac.uk/register/. MULOSIGE will not share your data with anyone else, and the project complies with the SOAS Data Protection Policy

Football and Migrant crises: Fatou Diome’s Le Ventre de l’Atlantique

By |2018-06-20T09:47:15+01:00June 19th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Published in 2003, Fatou Diome’s début novel Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (The Belly of the Atlantic) followed a defining moment in modern Franco-Senegalese history: the 2002 Fifa World Cup.

MULOSIGE recommends: Multiple impressions: the coexistence of scribal practices and printing technologies in texts

By |2018-06-06T14:10:20+01:00June 13th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

An interdisciplinary symposium and workshop for graduate students and early-career researchers on the, Histories of the production and reproduction of texts in Asian and African geographies by copyists, scriptoria, or printers.

From indigenous to Catalan?: Shifting paradigms of identity in the limits of Moroccan literatures

By |2018-06-11T10:27:55+01:00June 11th, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Hispanophone Maghribi authors have not yet made inroads into the Spanish literary scene and academia, nor in the Moroccan one. This double absence derives on the one hand from the particularities of this colonial context, but it is also related to the general absence of Hispanophone literatures within the field of postcolonial studies, where issues related to the modern Spanish colonies are not often discussed.

Beyond conflicts, crises and catastrophes: Afro-Pessimism in Western Media

By |2018-06-06T13:01:44+01:00May 31st, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Rachel Tabea Bossmeyer criticizes the afro-pessimism of mainstream Western Media and its ties to colonial literary productions.

Orature, Literature and History: Exploring Northern Indian Popular Culture (19c-20c) – PART 1

By |2018-05-02T13:22:32+01:00May 29th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , |

How does awareness of contemporary orature change the way we approach historical texts? How can we use these texts as sources to write a history of the region which produced them? How can we use narrative patterns to compare distant forms of orature? And how can we make orature seriously part of the study of world literature?