Literary Criticism

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For each region, we ask where ideas of what constitutes “good” literature and even literature itself comes from.

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference Report

By |2019-04-12T14:14:35+01:00February 21st, 2019|Categories: Horn of Africa, Journals, Literary Criticism, Maghreb, North India, Past events|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference was convened at SOAS University of London on the 11-12th January 2019. The methodological conditions behind the conference are to consider the historical moment of the Cold War in ways other than by splitting the world into two spheres.

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference: “How do we stop being somebody else’s image?”

By |2019-04-12T14:15:03+01:00February 20th, 2019|Categories: Literary Criticism, North India, Podcast|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Laetitia Zecchini discusses the politics of literary translation and publication, particularly surrounding the journal Quest funded by the International Council for Cultural Freedom, itself backed by the CIA. She examined the editor Nissim Ezekiel’s own positions and motivations, noting that for him Quest’s purpose was the create the conditions in which the magazine would provide the freedom to debate, argue, and hold different theoretical positions, creating a space of cultural independence which could in turn realise political independence.

Postcolonial Print Cultures Conference: Hindi literary activism in the 1950s

By |2019-04-12T14:15:40+01:00February 14th, 2019|Categories: Journals, Literary Criticism, North India, Podcast, Popular and Pulp Fiction|Tags: |

Professor Francesca Orsini (SOAS), examines the production and re-production of short stories in Hindi literary magazines in the 1950s, offering a case study of the Hindi magazine Kahani (Short Story, 1954). She argues that world literature can only be envisioned and produced through local views, rather than under one overarching banner of what constitutes “world literature.” Her talk highlights the medium of the magazine as a site of non-state literary activism that placed readers and young writers at the center, the preference for the story as opposed to the novel, and the multilingual knowledge that animated reading practices, even when publication occurred in a single language (Hindi).

Is the fragmentation method used by Bao Ninh in Sorrow of War effective?

By |2019-04-12T14:19:46+01:00December 13th, 2018|Categories: Literary Criticism, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

Christie Cheng is currently enrolled in the Masters in Cultural Studies programme at SOAS and is particularly interested in understanding contemporary Southeast Asian cultural production through film and literature. Prior to her MA course, she read English Literature at the National University of Singapore and worked as an Arts Manager for the Literary Arts

Ethiopia and the convergence of antifascist and anticolonial activism in the 1930s

By |2019-04-12T14:19:40+01:00November 21st, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Literary Criticism, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

Dr Sara Marzagora reviews Neelam Srivastava's new book "Italian Colonialism and Resistances to Empire, 1930-1977"

Arab Novelistic Traditions and the many multilingual realities of Arabic

By |2019-12-04T12:03:38+01:00July 27th, 2018|Categories: Literary Criticism, Maghreb, Maghreb Reading, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , |

In this piece MULOSIGE researcher July Blalack reflects on her book chapter on the history of Mauritanian novels and how it fits in with the larger project of The Oxford Handbook of Arab Novelistic Traditions (OUP 2017; edited by Waïl S. Hassan). The handbook showcases how the Arabic novel has developed in many different

Re-imagining Histories through Farthest Field: An Indian Story of the Second World War (Raghu Karnad)

By |2019-12-04T11:34:26+01:00July 25th, 2018|Categories: Education and Taste, Literary Criticism, North India, North India Readings, Reading, Themes|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are nations created by their histories? Raghu Karnad's book 'Farthest Field' problematizes British and Indian memorialisations of WWII.

Women poets of Ancient Greece, India, and Eritrea: a comparison across time and space

By |2019-04-12T14:29:33+01:00January 21st, 2018|Categories: Gender and Queer Studies, Horn of Africa, Literary Criticism, North India|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Tedros Abraham takes us on a journey across time and continents, comparing the way three women poets in Ancient Greece, India and Eritrea claim immortality through their poems and rebel against social norms

Retrospective: MULOSIGE roundtable on Aamir Mufti’s Forget English!

By |2019-04-12T14:32:06+01:00October 30th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Literary Criticism, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Fatima Burney looks back at our roundtable discussion with Professor Aamir Mufti and explores the consequences of his latest book, Forget English!, for the MULOSIGE project