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Reading group with S. Shankar (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa)

By |2019-04-12T14:38:43+01:00June 6th, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Past events, Reading Group, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

S. Shankar's work challenges reductive understandings of ‘world’ as presented in theories of ‘world literature’ and critiques conceptualisations of ‘literature’ as influenced by Western ideas of the ‘literary’

Reading group on Education and Comparative Colonialisms

By |2019-04-12T14:39:34+01:00March 15th, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, Past events, Reading Group|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Education systems, and the literary works they prioritized, are an excellent inroad to outlining how literary forms and cultures responded to colonialism

Reading group with Javed Majeed (King’s College London)

By |2019-04-12T14:39:53+01:00February 22nd, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, North India, Past events, Reading Group, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Javed Majeed joined us for an informative and enjoyable reading group where we discussed his work on the Linguistic Survey of India and its superintendent, George Grierson.

Why do we read so few translations?

By |2019-04-12T14:40:13+01:00January 29th, 2017|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions, Maghreb, News, North India, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , |

Statistics show that only between 3 - 5% of literary books published in the UK are translations. Ann Morgan in A Year of Reading the World writes about the difficulty in finding out about and getting hold of translations, even in the age of global publishing.

Qurratulain Hyder’s The Nautch Girl: A doubly multilingual text

By |2019-04-12T14:40:25+01:00January 29th, 2017|Categories: North India, Poetry, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

What happens when a text from 17th century India passes through a double translation over the next two centuries? Qurratulain Hyder's translation of Hasan Shah's The Nautch Girl reveals some of the changes that occur when texts move across time and space.

Al-hubb Al-mustaheel / L’amour impossible: Love in a Time of Artificial Wombs

By |2019-04-12T14:40:47+01:00January 29th, 2017|Categories: Digital Humanities and Archiving, Gender and Queer Studies, Genre, Maghreb, Reading|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Most Mauritanian fiction seems almost obsessively ethnographic but Moussa Ould Ibno breaks away from this trend and uses Science Fiction to comment on ethical questions of reproductive technology and love.

The Code of History and non-Western Pasts: does historiography travel?

By |2017-03-28T13:03:11+01:00October 12th, 2016|Categories: |Tags: , , |

History-writing is not the recreation of a past that is always-already there, lying mute and waiting for the historian to give it voice, but is instead one which constructs the past in ways that make it amenable to representation through the code of history by Professor Sanjay Seth (Goldsmiths).

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