Translations

/Translations

MULOSIGE seeks to re-emphasise the centrality of translation to existing discussion on World Literature.

MULOSIGE libraries project

By |2019-04-12T14:23:13+01:00August 2nd, 2018|Categories: Education and Taste, Events, Outreach, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Discover literature in Arabic at your local library! MULOSIGE is working with libraries in London to encourage them to stock books in multiple languages.

Football and Migrant crises: Fatou Diome’s Le Ventre de l’Atlantique

By |2019-04-12T14:26:08+01:00June 19th, 2018|Categories: Horn of Africa, Popular and Pulp Fiction, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Published in 2003, Fatou Diome’s début novel Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (The Belly of the Atlantic) followed a defining moment in modern Franco-Senegalese history: the 2002 Fifa World Cup.

Amazigh, Catalan, Spanish, Moroccan? Said El Kadaoui: Saying No At a Time of Flags

By |2019-04-12T14:28:58+01:00April 2nd, 2018|Categories: Maghreb, Reading, Translations|Tags: , |

Laura Casielles (Spain, 1986) is a PhD student at the Department of Arabic Studies at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Her research focuses on Moroccan authors writing in French and Spanish as well as on writers of the Moroccan diaspora in Spain and France. She has a degree in Journalism, another one in Philosphy and a master

Retrospective: MULOSIGE roundtable on Aamir Mufti’s Forget English!

By |2019-04-12T14:32:06+01:00October 30th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Literary Criticism, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Fatima Burney looks back at our roundtable discussion with Professor Aamir Mufti and explores the consequences of his latest book, Forget English!, for the MULOSIGE project

English is an African Language- the Language of Coexistence

By |2019-04-12T14:32:20+01:00October 27th, 2017|Categories: Horn of Africa, Interventions, Maghreb, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Mauritanian writer Mohmed Bouya Bamba argues that English has practical advantages for interethnic and intercountry communication in Africa, so Africans should reclaim the language instead of waging a futile ideological war

English an African Language? Hay’ khona! (Nope)

By |2019-04-12T14:32:45+01:00October 27th, 2017|Categories: Literary Criticism, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

In a response to recent articles in the Journal of African Cultural Studies, Wanga Gambushe (SOAS) asks whether English can be an African language from a particularly South African perspective

Imperial Languages/Languages and Empire: A reflection

By |2019-04-12T14:33:03+01:00October 20th, 2017|Categories: Education and Taste, Interventions, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , |

MULOSIGE's Francesca Orsini interrogates a new collaborative project that explores the interaction between languages and empire and suggests that 'imperial languages' as a conceptual category should be deployed carefully

To English, or not to English? Shakespeare as a translator

By |2019-04-12T14:34:00+01:00October 3rd, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Literary Criticism, Translations|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Guest contributor Jennifer E. Nicholson questions the idea of Shakespeare as a quintessentially English author, and describes instead ‘un-Englished’ Shakespeare who was not limited to either a single locality or language

Fictional translation in ‘Sāq al-bāmbū’ is erased in ‘The Bamboo Stalk’

By |2019-04-12T14:34:17+01:00September 29th, 2017|Categories: Interventions, Maghreb, Reading, Translations|Tags: , , , |

Kuwaiti novel 'Saq al-Bambu' is presented as a text translated from Tagalog even though it was originally written in Arabic- however, the English translation completely erases the fictional translation aspect.

The Tigrinya short story in Eritrea: emergence and development of a genre

By |2019-04-12T14:34:58+01:00August 26th, 2017|Categories: Genre, Horn of Africa, Interventions, Translations|Tags: , , , |

Akeder Ahmedin Issa guides us through the history of the short story in Tigrinya from the 1980s to the present, focusing on the parallel developments in Sahl, the centre of the Eritrean independence struggle, and the capital Asmara