This poem was translated by Professor Carlo Coppola as part of the MULOSIGE Translations project. You can explore our collection of Urdu Poetry here.

Professor Carlo Coppola, Oakland University

K̲h̲udkushī / Suicide

Today I’ve made a final resolve.

Before evening I

Had made the wall thin, licking it with my tongue;

But it rose up again before dawn,

When I made my way home

I saw darkness prostrate,

Sobbing-sad, clutching the road,

I reached home, tired of men.

My final resolve:

To jump today from the seventh story.

Today I’ve found life unveiled.

Long now I’ve been seeing

A fickle mistress;

But today under her bed

I’ve seen blood,

Fresh, shining,

A wine stench entangled in its smell.

She hasn’t come back to the bedroom yet,

But I’ve already made my last resolve.

I feel like boldly leaping out

The seventh-story window

That opens onto the roofs and streets.

Before evening I had made

The wall thin, licking it with my tongue;

But it rose up again before dawn.

Today for sure it will be leveled to the ground.

.

With Munibar Rahman

.

From: Māvarā (Beyond). Lāhaur: Maktabah-yi Urdū, [1940].  pp. 119 – 21

             

Today I’ve made a final resolve.

Before evening I

Had made the wall thin, licking it with my tongue;

But it rose up again before dawn,

When I made my way home

I saw darkness prostrate,

Sobbing-sad, clutching the road,

I reached home, tired of men.

My final resolve:

To jump today from the seventh story.

Today I’ve found life unveiled.

Long now I’ve been seeing

A fickle mistress;

But today under her bed

I’ve seen blood,

Fresh, shining,

A wine stench entangled in its smell.

She hasn’t come back to the bedroom yet,

But I’ve already made my last resolve.

I feel like boldly leaping out

The seventh-story window

That opens onto the roofs and streets.

Before evening I had made

The wall thin, licking it with my tongue;

But it rose up again before dawn.

Today for sure it will be leveled to the ground.

.

With Munibar Rahman

.

From: Māvarā (Beyond). Lāhaur: Maktabah-yi Urdū, [1940].  pp. 119 – 21

             

This poem is the last poem in Rashid’s first volume of poetry, Māvarā  (The Beyond); in this epitaph he is acknowledging the work of master calligrapher, Muhammed Sharif Abbassi.